Storm Stereo #29

Screen Shot 2017-12-13 at 1.39.14 PM.pngHello friends and foes, lovers and losers

I don’t feel like saying much—though it seems I always do, even if the people I want to be listening aren’t anyway—so just a few words on last week’s show. I’m happy to include some highlights from this year’s Static Shock Weekend, which happened in the Old Smoke this past November. Its long and rich punk history aside, the UK at large has been a hotbed for some incredible bands in recent years, with scenes budding and blossoming from Brighton to London and Leeds and from Cardiff to Glasgow and Sheffield. Perhaps I’ll put together a UK special in 2018 at some point, stray tuned, send me your suggestions.

I just want to say a few words about Haram, the most poignant hardcore band in Nuke York right now – if not because of their catchy and driving hardcore music but for their potent personal-political message. Meaning forbidden in Arabic and with songs sung entirely in Arabic, Haram stand at a charged intersection, challenging but also connecting all sides of the Venn diagram they inhabit: identity, religion, punk, politics, history, perception, purpose to name but a few. After their set, I had the chance to talk for a few minutes with their singer Nader, who is originally from Lebanon. With a calm and steady voice, articulate and eloquent, he spoke to me about some of the profound and deeply human concepts that drive his lyrics: the Lebanese civil war and its atrocities, losing friends and family, having to abandon one’s home, being an immigrant in a deeply troubled and divided USA, being persecuted for racial or religious differences, the various physical and emotional by-stories that come with such an experience. His expression was so powerful and thought-provoking, I felt humbled listening to him speak. He said that trip to the UK for the festival had helped open his eyes to new perspectives and he repeated how lucky and grateful he felt to be part of such a nurturing and supportive global punk scene—something that for me highlighted the humanity us punks often try to shake off because being human usually hurts more than being a mutant freak. At the end he also said ‘thank you for giving me the space to talk about this.’ I almost teared up. And for me, that’s what punk is all about: that dense and difficult but real-as-fuck feeling, that gut-churning proof that what we do—with our music and lyrics, our show spaces and radio shows, our art and our collectives—really does speak to people, and really can change lives.

As you may have noticed, the second part of the show had a recurring Sega Bodega theme. He’s one of my favourite sound architects and producers right now (perhaps you know him from his magical Soundtrack Series on NTS radio) and he’s just self-released a mixtape with original compositions inspired by cult cinema. It’s a brilliantly perceived and executed body of work, and I liked it so much I decided to play three tracks from it, from the movies Ghost, Dogtooth and X. There’s something to be said of music that is simultaneously fierce and bold while also unafraid to be delicate and moving, drawing inspiration and strength from the dark and difficult corners of our own psyche. He recently performed some of these compositions at St Barnabas church in London and you can watch it here.

Also on this show we listen to Princess Nokia, a force to be reckoned with and a bright example of what the future of music looks like (hint: ‘bad bitches we run shit’), Delia Gonzalez, a composer whose mix of minimal keys and cosmic beats is perfect, Hiroshi Yoshimura, whose ingenious Music for Nine Postcards record was just reissued, and much more.

Next show we delve into the dark and damp world of Greek underground noise and experimental electronics, with two hours of drone, ambient, noise, harsh electronics, dark techno and much more, specially curated by Andreas Kavvadias (d E).

Until then, don’t you fuck with my energy. With bitter love from outer space,

—Obsessionist

 

STORM STEREO 29 SETLIST

DOM THOMAS – Tropicalia Dream
RAKTA – Intro
RAKTA – Atrativos Da Mentira
RATA NEGRA – Por No Estar Sola
EXIT ORDER – Mass Panic
HARAM – Not A Terrorist – ليست ارهابي
L.O.T.I.O.N. – Born in 1984
ULTRA – Porno
LIMP WRIST – Square One
NEKRA – Art School
RUNT – DWP
MONOTON – Wasser
SADE – Soldier of Love (Exotic Remix)
PRINCESS NOKIA – Brujas
FKA TWIGS – Two Weeks
POST MALONE – Rockstar
SEGA BODEGA – Ghost
SEGA BODEGA – Dogtooth
DELIA GONZALEZ – Roulette
HIROSHI YOSHIMURA – Blink
AYYA – Second Mistake
LENA PLATONOS – Thalassa
SEGA BODEGA – X
DJ RICHARD – Path of Ruin
RAÄR – Sometimes I Hear Sirens
ANTONI MAIOVVI – Revenge is Sweeter Than Wine
EMAK – Tanz In Den Himmel
LE SYNDICAT ELECTRONIQUE – Strawberry Flower
STEPHAN EICHER – Miniminiminijupe
FACTRIX – A Night to Forget
RAKTA – Outro
LIMP WRIST – In My Mind

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