Year End Top 10: 2016

Another year is gone and a new one is already here and, as tradition has it among list-makers, music-lovers, record collectors and obsessive freaks like me, the yearly Top 10 beckons. I had originally said to myself I wouldn’t compile one – most of these records have already been written about a lot (they deserve it after all) and I can’t say I had the time or mental capacity to keep track and listen to every new release like I used to other years. That’s also because I mainly jammed Molly Nilsson’s “Mountain Time” and this song on repeat. However, the lovely Lughole punks asked me if I wanted to write a few words for a retrospective zine they’re putting together (stay up to date on that here) and, well, I couldn’t say no. So, for the record, here are eleven (because life is too short to confine yourself to ten) records I got most excited about in 2016; an extended ‘Punk in 2016’ playlist will soon follow with many more bands that came near and dear to my heart. Thanks to all the bands and labels that made 2016 a bit more tolerable. Fully biased reviews in alphabetical order.

a2111924034_10ANXIETY – S/T MLP (La Vida Es Un Mus)

Seriously, what can I say that would be worthy? Call me weak or a weirdo, but I physically had trouble listening to this record without falling into a neurotic pit of existential angst followed by breathless euphoric nihilism – it’s that good. It’s a challenge from start to finish and I love that in a record, even if it does mean locking myself in the house for the day as a result. It’s angular and uncomfortable, musically uncompromising, emotionally confrontational, psychologically haunting, crudely honest, manically unafraid while introspectively reflective and I feel the meta image of a broken mirror within a mirror within a frame fits in somewhere here but honestly… I don’t feel I can write about this record, my jumbled stream-of-consciousness just doesn’t do them the justice they deserve and there is surely a lot that can be written about this band – their sound and imagery, their outlook and output – and there have been numerous, better written pieces about them and you should read those. However I feel the ingenious band name encompasses and compounds it all much better. Their choice of name alone, and an analysis of their lyrics, could easily spawn a 2,000-word essay on the meaning, use, decomposition and reconstruction of language in post-modern underground music counterculture. They push buttons and boundaries, exploring new ground while staying true to their inner freak power that fuels this stunning, beautifully unnerving concoction of stress-and-release. I first saw them live in March and to this day remember how utterly inspiring they were, how energized I felt, it was like a revelation. Call me slow, but months later it’s still sinking in how phenomenal this release is – it will ripple and go down in punk history, I swear.

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BARCELONA – Pueden Ser Ellos 7” (La Vida Es Un Mus)

One of the Barcelona greats. Growling vocals, frenzied, trance-inducing drumming with crashing cymbals, and relentless, screeching and blown out chords carry you through four tracks in five minutes of pummeling, primitive, insurrectionist hardcore musick. Opener “Caudillo” is flawless in all its monotonic, blazing, 47-second glory, crashing into “Infierno de Cobardes” that sounds like it’s literally falling over itself with power and passion. The guitar on “Quien Coño Manda” scorches like fire, seamlessly shifting pace and hurtling into closing stomper “Dios Te Salve.” Stripped down in structure but glowing red hot from within, this is the naked, ugly, angry spirit of punk and it’s perfect. The artwork by drummer Oriol Roca – a brilliant artist in his own right and defining factor of the band’s sound and aesthetic – is tailored for the release and is of course superb.

a1796109479_16CHAIN OF FLOWERS – S/T LP (ALTER)

New favourite band of the year for sure. I saw them live before listening to the record and, while they sound different on both occasions, Cardiff’s CHAIN OF FLOWERS do both magnificently well. The record is a well-produced mix of shoegaze and post-punk, with catchy and melodic vocals, soaring and evocative chords, dreamy and melancholic keys, and tight, passionate drumming. The songs seamlessly mesh with one another, making you push the needle back to the start again and again before flipping to repeat. Live, I saw them in the UK on a mini-tour with DIÄT a handful of times, and every time I fell for it even more: dynamic and intense playing that’s powered by their tight-knit connection and captivating collective energy. When we got back to Berlin, to make it through post-tour blues, Iffi and I jammed this record on repeat every single morning for a week both at home and the record shop. “Crisis” became the aptly titled personal anthem of my year.

a1715811942_10DHK / MAQUINA MUERTA – split 12” (Metadona)

I got this record on the 30th of December 2015 when I went to Barcelona for the first time and saw a bunch of wicked local bands at a squat now sadly evicted (RIP Transformadors). Maquina Muerta played (now based in Mallorca by way of Mexico) and were as powerful as the record. I love the speed and intensity, the steamrolling, nightmarish sound, the reverbed vocals totally blowing me away. DHK from Peru play unpretentious, raw D-beat with an urgency and despairing aggression that seeps through every aspect of the band: the grating guitars and vocals, the violent, bleak realism of the lyrics, the shambolic clatter of the drums, the flooring bass. A poignant collaboration with haunting artwork linking everything together.

a3661276530_10EFIALTIS – S/T 7″ (Static Shock)

I think this might be one of the bands I spoke most about in 2016 – definitely year of the NIGHTMARE. Pulling three tracks from their demo plus one new one, London’s EFIALTIS sound even more powerful on vinyl – and their second 2016 EP on LVEUM is only further proof. Opening self-titled track “Efialtis” is their pièce de résistance, their Imperial March, and is the definition of a banger if ever I heard one, stomping right in, dominant and unafraid, forceful and disruptive. For me this record is a giant finger to all the men who can play the fuck out of their instruments but still choose to make boring ass music with no soul or attitude, two things EFIALTIS possess in abundance. With members now scattered across the globe, it’s a darn shame I never got to see them live, as I know their abrasive energy translates differently on stage. Check out the interview I did with them for MRR. The EFIALTIS is dead. Long live the EFIALTIS.

a3803631329_10GUTTER / ΧΩΡΙΣ ΟΙΚΤΟ – split 7″ EP (Scarecrow)

NWGHC: A great release and a much-needed breath of fresh air for the current Greek hardcore landscape, this split features two of the best bands in Athens right now. On the one side, newcomers ΧΩΡΙΣ ΟΙΚΤΟ (read horís íkto, meaning ‘without mercy’) unload three tracks of brooding hardcore, with despairing, gravelly vocals in Greek, burning riffs and up-beat D-beat drumming that give this a defining edge and distinct texture. On the flip are GUTTER, a solid hardcore band that’s been going strong for half a deacde or so, with tight, straight but catchy hardcore with ’80s infuences – my fave vocals in Greek HC right now. Between the two bands, members also play in (also worthy bands) ANTIMOB, CUT OFF, SARABANTE, ARHI TOU TELOUS and more.

a2857544673_10HEAVY METAL – LP LP (Static Age)

The oddest of them all, this Berlin-based wildcard took everyone by surprise. Running like a drugged up mixtape, flying all kinds of freak flags, each track marches to a different beat – with rock beats alternating with dance beats – while still sounding distinctly HEAVY METAL. They don’t confine themselves to any one genre, giving their sound a seemingly limitless range of options, from noisy beat experimentation and mean-riffed post-punk explosions, to stripped down rock’n’roll and spite-dripping noise-punk. “Don’t Call Me Brother” is guaranteed to get the bodies moving, while closer “Total Bullshit,” the record’s crown jewel, is a flawless punk manifesto for the modern age. Insane or ingenious, does it really even matter?

a1096271411_10LUST FOR YOUTH – Compassion LP (Sacred Bones)

Quite the sensation, Denmark’s LUST FOR YOUTH are more than music – they’re a brand, a lifestyle, an artifact of decadent indulgence. LFY create a haven to go back to again and again – like a magic hotel room in a world through the looking glass, full of fabulous people, expensive drugs and an unlimited supply of bottled desire/despair sponsored by Dom Perignon. It could have been the best of times, it could have been the worst of times, LFY create a cinematic, stylized soundtrack to what otherwise might have been painful or ugly memories, capturing and coating them in deep beats, dreamy vocals and delicate melodies, adding their distinctively chic sonic filter to everything they touch. Music for lovers and losers, for elevator sex, hotel room sex, sex with strangers, your emotions on drugs, dancing high at the club with tears in your eyes, leaving the show without saying goodbye, kissing in Ubers and crying on planes, falling in love and mixing pleasure with pain and cocaine.

screen_20shot_202016-01-10_20at_209-13-31_20am_originalNARCOESTADO – S/T 7” (Going Underground)

I played this record so many times this year I think I know all the lyrics by heart (best way to improve my poor Spanish). Mexico’s NARCOESTADO made a record that’s like comfort food to me – reliable and nourishing for the soul. Every track is catchy and familiar-sounding, like someone you just met but feel you’ve known your whole life. There’s just enough melancholy to the vocals, lyrics and riffs to speak to my rotten heart, while still sounding aggravated and rough enough to match my angry disappointments. It’s the soundtrack to those confused and lonely nights, after the party has ended and the fight is over (you lost), and you’re left walking home alone in the cold wondering what the fucking point to any of it is. So you turn the music up and keep walking.

a3281916634_10ΟΔΟΣ 55 – 2 LP (Eirkti)

ODOS 55 (meaning ‘street 55’ in Greek) deliver noisy minimalism drenched in dystopian angst, and the follow up to their stellar 2013 LP is just as daunting and haunting as I’d hoped. The scarce vocals are mechanical and hypnotic, angry and yelled out in Greek, a textural collage of sounds layering slowly, creating a neurotic, claustrophobic mise-en-abyme of synths and beats. There’s a liberating kind of mania to it, with beats arising like an industrial pulse from an underground vent, and synths bleeding their way through the tightly soundscaped compositions. Excellent local and international influences inform but don’t overshadow ODOS 55’s own creative vision, making this two-piece the most interesting and original project in Greece right now. Sounds for a life of cemented dreams and shifting sidewalks.

a1147212805_10THE LOWEST FORM ­– Personal Space 12” (Harbinger Sound/Iron Lung)

Sophomore albums are tricky, but the UK’s THE LOWEST FORM return to outdo themselves. Moving away from the rather general and confining ‘noise not music’ section of hardcore, they’ve created a whole new ‘noise as music’ section just for themselves – yes they basically play like a hardcore band, but the compositions and execution, the production and aesthetics behind the finished result, they all prove TLF to be so much more than a mere hardcore band. Darker and more focused, in a transcendent kind of way, they plod and gallop (literally, there are horses on this record) through two sides in less than 20 minutes – like frantically elbowing their way through a noisy crowd in search of the record’s elusive title notion (best record title of the year BTW). They change pace relentlessly, layering for perspective and density, yet everything speeds up and slows down, fades away and comes together in all the right ways and at all the right times – including when you least expect it. While the writing is still characteristically off-kilter – cerebral yet simple, never letting you get too comfortable with any one state, veering off into seizure-like strumming and burning solos, breaking out into thick beats – they seem to have given the songs more breathing room (with still no track exceeding the three-minute mark) making this their catchiest, most consistently explored release to date from start to finish. The playing is bursting with force and thanks to the production (that’s a touch less noisy but adequately textured) every twisted chord, grated bass line and signature drum-roll sounds just right (including when it’s buried or distorted), the fire-breathing vocals and heady lyrics setting the tone throughout. The negative ecstasy continues and it sounds wicked.

HONOURABLE MENTIONS:

DAUÐYFLIN – Drepa Drepa 7″ (Erste Theke Tonträger)

Red-hot hardcore from ice-cold Iceland with a dirty and shambolic sound, furious vocals and memorable tracks. Don’t snooze on this one!

CAROL – Breakdown/So Low 45 (Weyrd Son)

Minimal coldwave with a strong dreamy pop element from the ’80s, a perfect single that captures the beauty and pain of desire.

EXOTICA – Musique Exotíque #1 Demo Cass. (La Vida Es Un Mus)

Exciting and fiery punk that’s catchy with lots of energy. Wanna sing along and pogo to this in the pit!

GOOD THROB – The Queen Sucks Nazi Cock 7″ (La Vida Es Un Mus)

Can this band outdo itself any more? Most original band of the decade, another tongue-in-cheek/gnashing teeth release.

HARAM – What Do You See? 7″ (Toxic State)

One of the most radical releases of the year, everything about it is challenging and different, from the songs and vocals in Arabic to the visual and lyrical concepts within. In this day and age bands like Haram are sorely needed and this interview is worth your time.

KRIMEWATCH – Demo Cass. (self-released)

Catchy, up-beat but sharp and pissed off hardcore  – the vocal twists are some of my favourite of the year, as is the track sung in Japanese, a total 10/10!

LUMPY AND THE DUMPERS – Huff My Sack LP (La Vida Es Un Mus)

The kings of snark on what feels like a concept record for mockery and loathing. “I Wanna Move To New York” played on repeat for months.

SIEVEHEAD – S/T 7″ (Static Shock)

Tense and intense post-punk that spears right through the heart. I’m glad to say I saw them live a couple times and they take it to a whole other level, with hella tight playing and exploding energy to spare.

STRUTTER – S/T 7″ (Static Shock)

Attitude-filled hardcore punk with fire riffs, their EP was on constant rotation all summer and they were a highlight at Static Shock fest in November.

WARTHOG – Culture? 7″ (Beach Impediment)

Post-modern hardcore critique of an insidiously oppressive world. Hardcore with force and brains that works! ‘Culture?’ is a fucking anthem, current and reflective of the here and now in a spine-chilling way. Fantastic set at Static Shock festival!

HEAVY METAL…again

HMLast’s weeks review wasn’t enough, I decided a re-write was in order, so Sean Forbes (Hard Skin) and I both wrote a lil’ something about the new Heavy Metal LP LP for Static Shock Musik. Even though we hadn’t spoken or read each others’ work, we both referenced the Crass comps —uncanny! And Sean’s likening of the track “Total Bullshit” to the Sleaford Mods is totally spot on—the same thing went through my mind when I first heard it! And of course it’s always interesting to see what tracks stand out to different people—but there is a common consensus on how good “Total Bullshit” is! From Static Shock’s website:

Sean:
And you thought the world had run out of great band names!! No sir—welcome to the debut album by Heavy Metal. Over the space of 13 tracks the three piece from Berlin make dirty punk, childlike chaos and raw DIY gems with reckless abandon. In parts it sounds like pissed idiots with a 4 Track recorder armed with a load of ATV 7”s and in other parts like some obscure Australian DIY 7” from 1979. Standout cuts are “Snail of Rock” which is all snotty 77 punk rock, ‘Would You Adam and Eve It?’ which could have been one a classic Step Forward Records release and “Total Bullshit” which sounds like the Sleaford Mods but with the recording quality of Bullshit Detector compilations on Crass. You used to love Heavy Metal when you were young and now you can fall in love with Heavy Metal all over again.

Lydia:
After only six rehearsals and no previous recordings to date, Static Age is proud to introduce Berlin’s emerging powerhouse, HEAVY METAL. With this astonishing first full-length, HEAVY METAL crash through 13 tracks of noisy, antisocial, high-tension punk, eagerly mixing electric punk aggression with woozy electronic euphoria.

The songwriting, which hits that sweet spot between rudimentary racket and surreal elaboration, brings the band’s restlessness to the forefront—they could break out into dance or a fight at any minute, everything sounds possible. No sense is left on the cutting room floor; instead, the clamoring drums, buzzing bass and snappy riffs are cut with catchy synths, bountiful pedal action and an exploding cocktail of bleeps, loops, samples and solos.

This ticked off diversity shines on multiple, rewarding occasions. Single-ready “Don’t Call Me Brother,” with its kaleidoscopic synths and old-school beat, is a bona fide dance floor pleaser despite its antagonizing lyrical content, and “Staring at the Rich Kids” is an instant classic, a stomping class critique that could have easily been found on a Bullshit Detector comp circa 1979. Yet it is bonus track, “Total Bullshit,” that flawlessly showcases the creative menace found in the wake of their nihilism.

A joyride of shambolic punk, with a frustrated Welshman spitting wit and sarcasm into the microphone, “LP” could be the circumstantial soundtrack to a weeklong drug binge, going through all the motions to match, including ecstasy, hysteria, hostility and an uncontrollable, primitive urge to fight and fuck. And by recording everything themselves, HEAVY METAL’s already bizarre sound is pushed further into the delightfully deranged corners of their collective potential.

An intoxicating stream of consciousness, “LP” was recorded in their Lichtenberg practice space and mastered by the wizard of sonic chiaroscuro Daniel Husayn at North London Bomb Factory, making it sound as unhinged and sardonic as it is distinctively captivating. They’re already working on what is promised to be a much anticipated follow up, so get into it or don’t. Just don’t call ’em brother.

Standout tracks:Don’t Call Me Brother, Haywired, Here Come’s Sparky,Staring at the Rich Kids, Total Bullshit

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Also, coming up in the new issue of Maximum Rocknroll is an interview that my friend Juliana and I did with Bay Area SxE HC band Tørsö, as well as Part 2 of the Yugoslavian punk special, this time with bands from Croatia, including personal faves Kaos and Paraf! Also, you can find a talk with the director of Prodiga Hija (Prodigal Daughter) Mabel Valdiviezo, who with her personal documentary tells her tale of growing up in Lima, Peru during the ’80s in the Sub-T punk scene, moving to the US and living as an undocumented immigrant and then going back again. I remember she reached out to me a few months ago for an interview and sadly I couldn’t due to travels, so I am looking forward to reading her interview in print! That and of course much, much more! 🙂

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HEAVY METAL – Lp LP

heavymetal“Hysteria. Static Frustration. Broke as shit.”

With a name as generic as it is ingenious, and an attitude that’s as snarky as it is senile, HEAVY METAL have not only blurred the thin line between scathing joke and downright unhinged, they’ve done away with it completely. In its place, 29 minutes of pissed off piss taking, sonically fucked up and fucked with. With thirteen tracks—clocking in at an average of 2.20 minutes each—HEAVY METAL’s first record plays like a deranged audio collage of freak events—uncomfortably enjoyable in its oxymoronic glory. Grating chords and repetitive riffs, verbal hostility dripping with snarling critique; drums that crash and bang in a trance—a right racket—and cerebral synths and catchy electro beats dropping in like they’re tripping out. The noisy, shambolic production perfectly matches the surreal compositions, which are a deliberate blend of the absurdly simple with the simply absurd.

Standout tracks: Don’t Call Me Brother, Haywired, Here Come’s Sparky, Staring at the Rich Kids, Total Bullshit

Notable comments: “Wow, it’s like the Germs or Zounds covering Devo on speed or something” and “it’s on a completely different plane of existence,” as well as “How the hell can you listen to this noisy shit?”

Out now Static Age Records, and with a new record already in the works!

EFIALTIS / ΕΦΙΑΛΤΗΣ – s/t 7″

One of my fave bands from London right now, EFIALTIS (Nightmare), have a new 7″ out and I was more than happy to write up a few words for it for Static Shock Records.

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After last year’s haunting demo, London’s Efialtis get the vinyl treatment with a fresh EP on Static Shock Records. Featuring three primitive stompers from their tape plus a riveting new one, Efialtis crash through the ruins of reality like an angry goddess in search of retribution. Four feral tracks of stripped down, high-energy, mid-tempo Punk, with despotic vocals and ominous Greek lyrics. The sharp guitar and buzzing bass wade through combative drumming, all tough as nails and perfectly enhancing the nightmarish unease underlying their sound. Ten minutes of ’80s-inspired, rudimentary jaggedness, complete with catchy songwriting, tight delivery and a production that’s appropriately massive and the right amount of shambolic. Featuring members of Good Throb, Sarcasm, Dregs, Body Butter and more. A skull-crashing must-have for the coming apocalypse.


First press is limited to 500 copies and comes with hand-stamped sleeves, risographed inserts and also includes a download.

 

JEALOUSY – Paid for It LP

a1938584319_10I like experiential records; how uncensored and raw they can be. They’re not always as thematically connected as concept albums, but they retain that dynamic focus that pushes the record forward while pulling you the listener in. And, in this case, the proverbial rabbit hole descent comes with a soundtrack that’s potently intoxicating.

A one-man project of experimental twisting and turning, JEALOUSY is the brainchild of CCR HEADCLEANER’s Mark Treise. His sophomore record, Paid for It, manifests like a vision. Looped, layered and distorted, the sounds come together like a series of fragmented images flickering through Treise’s mind. Swaying from highs to lows, he meanders through nine hypnotic tracks as if going from room to room in an abandoned home studio, exploring the crevices and acoustics, picking at wounds from the past, deliberately pealing away the layers of illusion, and creating a space for his soul to sulk in peace.

And the fact that Treise doesn’t seem set on pleasing no one’s desires but his own is what makes this record all the more appealing. His uncompromising, self-indulgent attitude has not merely produced the self-portrait of a modern hedonist; it has resulted in a raw and intimate confessional of a complex existentialist. And while the “Man With his Electric Guitar” genre often falls short for lack of authenticity and depth—a two-dimensional line—the few but effective elements on Paid for It circle Treise’s existence like an armillary sphere.

A distinct element in this recording is drummer Don Bolles of the GERMS, whose dynamic presence equalizes the many smaller bodies of sound that gravitate towards Treise’s central system of exoneration: minimal, hypnotic bass with early electronic and industrial touches outlining the bi-polar post-punk that sways at the core. The compositions range from eerily neurotic and droney, to tense and trance-like, drawing on bands like SUICIDE, the VELVET UNDERGROUND as much as CHROME, PSYCHIC TV or MOON DUO. The cryptic poetics are murmured and moaned like Jim Reid channeling Alan Vega, and the alternations between scornful noise, lo-fi haziness and anodyne repetition reflect the nuances of a libertine enamored by self-destruction.

Tracks like “Doin’ a Little Time,” with its mesmerizing bass riff and distantly crashing cymbals, “Fresh Kill,” with its come-down revelations slurred over grated metal chords, and of course the ingeniously titled “Sentenced to Life,” where the vocals drip with decadent desire and the synths sound like an E trip to outer space. Hissing jabs of tonal aggression and a highly effective incorporation of real-world sounds—breaking bottles, snapping drumsticks, electric saws, field recordings—give the songs texture and perspective, and a thick air of unabashed bewilderment. It’s shambolic, impressionistic and rough—and unapologetically so—but that’s why it’s so appealing.

Stand out tracks: Sentenced to Life, Doin’ a Little Time, Eyes of my Love, Fresh Kill, Go Away

Out now on Moniker Records.

Record of the Week on MRR: LA MISMA – Kanizadi LP

a3967329098_2LA MISMA – “Kanizadi” LP
This is so perfect just go buy it now—just do it! LA MISMA from New York are a force to be reckoned with and, after just one 7” and a few demos, this ferocious full-length hurtles through the punk universe like a blazing comet! I can’t single out one song on this record because the consistency and character—the bite!—is found in every song. Each jam packed with pogo power, this is short and fast, heavy and solid, structured but crumbling under the intensity of the execution. A commendable homage to the CRISIS guitar sound, fueled by UK82 punk power and laced with the venom of ’80s Italian punk, but never limited or overshadowed by those influences. The guitar mixes creeping hooks and solos with frontal-attack riffs. The hypnotic bass booms and rumbles with the power of a coming earthquake. The stomping, cymbal-crashing drums are crude and commandeering like a primeval instinct. The vocalist spits, squeals and yelps, all passionate Portuguese delivery and transfixing impressionistic lyrical content. The result is spine-chilling, catchy and driving all at the same time. The production works around the core sound like a Rubik’s cube doing every element justice—the twisting guitar distortion, the bristle and weight of the bass, the dissonance in the vocals, the pitch and punch in the drums. 18 minutes and 53 seconds of white-knuckled, jaw-clenching, hair-raising energy that has my mind and body positively ecstatic. Comes with a 28-page booklet and A2 poster designed by the vocalist. For fans of: good fucking music! Exceptional! (Lydia A)
(Toxic State / La Vida Es Un Mus)

Record of the Week on MRR: 92 – Cenzura/Cukrarnar LP

r-7090463-1433501179-1515-jpeg92 – “Cenzura/Cukrarnar”
The travel back in time continues! Next stop: Ljubljana, Slovenia circa 1978. Like many bands from former Yugoslavia, 92—who get their name from the police’s phone number, the equivalent to 911 in the US—fuse new wave sounds with reconstructed regional and traditional musical elements, all filtered through punk with a keyboard twist. 92 were informed by, but not dependent on or limited to, bands such as the CLASH, SEX PISTOLS and STONES, and concepts such as nihilism, Dadaism and social critique. Their logo of the number 92 inside a triangle charms and perplexes me despite its simplicity. This results in upbeat tracks with layers of choppy and grazing guitars, dancey drums alongside swelling bass, and soulful, raw organ riffs haunting the whole thing. The lyrics are critical and sharp. “Cukrarnar” (“Sugar Works Man”) tells the story of a “raged vagrant on the street […], he’s dirty and full of trash, in sugar works every night he spends, but then he wakes up on the bench.” “Cenzura,” which discusses the issue of state censorship, is slightly darker, with its dense opening riff and staccato keyboards. “Basically you corrected everything on your own.” The keys are wonderfully expressive, tying this whole concept together in a unique manner; at times sounding almost like a child’s melodica, at others more like a breezy church organ, or carrying the frenetic beat in an almost accordion-at-the-fair fashion. Their collected works LP, which was released in 2013 also by NE! Records and reviewed in these pages, is definitely worth checking out if you have an interest in early European punk, but this 45 works as an excellent introduction to this extraordinary band. Two tracks that are equal parts vibrant demonstration as they are creative exuberance. As always, comes in a beautiful packaging, with lots of pictures and translated lyrics. Check out their interview in MRR #378 and hvala NE! Records for doing such a great job!
(NE!)